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centered on peace commemorating the 50t 50th anniversary of martin luther king's march on washington. is there any way we could be firing rockets at syria before he delivers that speech? >> i seriously doubt that number one for the optics, number two, the u.n. in texters are on the ground. we expect the administration to release a case publicly that gets away from the circumstance case that you and i are talking about and present a more factual case, specific examples of how the assad regime went forward with this. that's what we're expecting. i don't expect this to happen today while the president is speaking, although it is a much anticipated speech, the 50t 50th affords of the "i have a dream" speech that culminated with the march on washington 50 years ago. >> thank you so much, live from washington. >> the iranian stream leader says intervention in syria by the u.s. would be a "disaster." david jackson is on the ground in lebanon. thank you for joining us. what's the reaction in the middle east to the supreme leader's statement this morning? >> morgan, across the board, it's all
washington martha. she was always called patsy as lady bird johnson was never called claudia. so i was just wondering, you mentioned in his letters when he referred to her in his letter that it was just mentioned on the telephone that he did call her patsy. and i also wanted to mention that in the story that i'm reading about martha and george washington that the house, mt. vernon, was originally the home of his half brother, george washington's half brother. that he lived in a smaller farm. and i wondered if you are going to talk anything about his years as a surveyor or is this really about the years with martha as an adult? >> thank versus much. this is actually martha washington's time in the sun. so we won't talk about george's early career. what about the nickname patsy? >> patsy, pat, patty were the nicknames for martha in those days just as peg or peggy is a nickname for margaret. the martha nickname has fallen out of favor. nobody was named patricia back then. the only patsies were martha's. that was simply the common name. >> the smaller farm she's reference ing? >> smaller, it wa
economy. they are making huge investments. one of the problems in washington is due to the tea party. the tea party wants to have a sequester an across-the-board cuts. with to stop that mentality. we are investments to infrastructures -- we have to stop that mentality. we have to make investments to infrastructure. development, we have used our strack structure -- our tax structure to bring back jobs from overseas. chinese used cap structured and subsidies to encouragement and faxing. manufacturing can come back to unite states, but we have to encourage it. companies cannot move their money overseas. companies will stay here and ofufactured here because transportation cost. we're not doing that. we have to make a difference. >> that let me to where i want to go. there are those who say that it is time for america to do something to jumpstart our economic recovery. 162,000 jobs disappointed wall street. we had to do something with our tax code to reflect the need of a modern-day economy. i harken back to the days when i was a young reporter covering bill bradley who came up with the f
>>> on the broadcast tonight from washington -- ready to strike. the u.s. prepare as military attack on syria, but tonight the house speaker tells the president to slow down. we'll take a closer look at the possible consequences of american military action. >>> remembering the dream. 50 years after dr. king's historic speech, a huge crowd comes here to celebrate, remember and inspire the nation to finish the job. >>> death sentence for the army psychiatrist convicted in the massacre at fort hood. >>> and air scare. a new warning tonight about the wildfire at yosemite and what it's doing to the air people are breathing so many miles away. "nightly news" begins now. >>> and good evening. i'm lester holt in for brian. here in washington, talk of war and peace at the lincoln memorial where martin luther king jr. delivered his famous "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago today. president obama headlined a chorus of speakers saluting the racial justice that changed this country. a lot more on that in a few minutes. >>> but first, the remmings in this city about a possible military at
speaking, turkey, saudi arabia and cutter. >> washington and london compared to -- prepared for possible strikes against serial -- serious military targets. >> let's go now to washington and our correspondent there. what is the latest you are hearing about how the talks have been going in the u.n.? >> russia and china did not back the draft resolution, condemning their use of chemical weapons by the assad regime and asking for permission to take all necessary measures to protect civilians. the draft resolution would authorize force to protect civilians from chemical weapons. it was not a big surprise, at least not for me. after a meeting in the security council, the ambassadors in france and the united kingdom came together in a meeting behind closed doors and now they are consulting with governments in paris, london and washington. i don't expect any u.n. resolution today or tomorrow. >> the british foreign secretary says talks at the u.n. need to go on for a few more days. does that mean an imminent attack is off the table? >> i don't think this is true. i think the americans and briti
approaches this situation is a top priority. "the washington post" published something online that u.s.,s details about the that the budget has grown enormously since 9/11, that the cia is far bigger than outside experts had estimated, that the u.s. is involved in new cyber programs to attack other programs in countries. this information has never been released despite efforts from outside folks. does the president believe this is helpful now and the current climate to have discussion about the details about how the u.s. is spending its money in these departments to get a better understanding, as he said, make the public comfortable with how this money is being spayed and what type of programs are being used? -- that storyhed was published since i walked out here. i'm not in a position to comment on a specific story. the president believes that strengthening public confidence in these programs is important to the success of these programs. there is little debate about the fact these programs are critical to our national security, that they have made a role in protecting the homeland
be the secretary of dhs is the most thankless job in washington. that is not true. no doubt, it is a very big and comics job. it is literally a 24/7 job, that as my successor will soon learn, it is also one of the most rewarding jobs there is. what you do hear matters to the lives of people all across our great nation him and your decisions affect them in direct and tangible ways. you make sure their families are safe from terrorist threats, that their local first responders have equipment and training and funding, and that when disaster strikes people who have lost everything are given food and shelter and hope. and that thanks for that is not owed any single individual or cabinet secretary, but to that 240,000 dhs employees, many of whom work in tough conditions around the clock to accomplish our shared and noble mission, and that includes some who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. they are the backbone of your nation's homeland security, and over the past 4 1/2 years, it has been my pleasure to serve with them and build a more agile department of homeland security. i thank
morning, august 15. ahead on the "washington journal ," your reaction to the latest development in egypt and what the u.s. response should be. you should join the conversation at (202) 585-3880, our line for republicans. (202) 585-3881 for democrats. we also have our line for independents at (202) 585-3882. join us on facebook, send us a tweet, or e-mail address, journal@c-span.org. at somegin with a look of the headlines from outside the u.s., the "guardian" newspaper -- egypt's bloody crackdown. when the story first went to prince, the death toll was 200 78. overnight, the death toll has been updated to 421. there is this from the "miami killed asundreds egypt's forces storm the protest camps. a similar headline from "usa today," egypt the reps in chaos. -- a reps and chaos. from the "wall street journal" website -- egypt's military regime a reps setting off a day of violence that left at least 421 people dead. the government fractured and ties with its international partners in tatters. cairo streets were calm this morning following the curfew overnight with funerals for the dead. fur
the killing of civilians, washington refuses to condemned the generals for the recent power grab barack obama interrupted his holiday to do announce the violence. cannot determine the future of egypt. that is for the up -- egyptian people. we do not take sides with any particular party or political figure. to blame is tempting the united states or the west or some other actor, for what has gone wrong. he has canceled a planned military exercise with egypt. 1.3 billion dollars in american military aid is in the pipeline but will be reviewed. despite everything, egypt is a key for u.s. goals in the middle east. support is crucial to maintaining the peace treaty with israel. washington supports egypt against militants on israel's borders in the sinai. and the u.s. navy's access to the suez canal is controlled by egypt. and trieste house hard to work with whoever is in power in cairo. was mohamedly that morsi. today it is the military. it is a policy that has left them with no friends or influences in egypt. officials are saying there is no benefit anymore from supporting the generals. >> i think
in washington but first this report from jane ferguson. >> reporter: anti-military retestprotests in egypt has cha. they replace the demonstrations. here, around a thousand people gathered around the migathered . >> translator: i'm here to say no with an open chest. i know there are murders from the army and thugs with the police at any moment but i am standing here steadfast with us. >> reporter: the protests are daily now and they are noisy. they are in honor to protest and to avoid the serious crack downs. on tuesday, the anti-coup alliance says it has a new tactic to try to maintain. >> translator: the situation in this is tense what we do in each area and also depends on the curfew. there's demonstrations. every government has its own. some you will find -- the change in protests. >> reporter: the presidential candidate, the country called terrorism. that's the way those supporting the military-led government have been referring to those opposed to them. >> translator: issue needs to be raised. will anyone accept egypt to be a victim of a terrorism. this is the issue, egypt will not accep
. >>> and 50 years after that historic march on washington, looking back at the dream and the dreamer. ♪ >>> diplomats are gathering in new york to discuss potential military intervention in syria. and un inspectors are continuing their investigation in a suburb of damascus. the chemical weapons attack happened one week ago today. david cameron has now called for meeting of the un security counsel permanent members. the security counsel has been debating action since it began more than two years ago, but so far no decisive action has been taken because of division among members of the counsel. the council consists of 15 members, of those five are permanent. they are the only nations with the power to veto the council's resolutions. joining us now for the late zest john terret. >> dell, i think you have to remember that the british have a parliamentary system. the executive sits in the chamber. it's a bit like having the white house in the house of representatives. so therefore there is a lot more pressure on the executives over there to make sure they do things legally. and i think
on washington remains a seminal moment in american history. tonight, we kick off a series of discussions to mark the anniversary. >> we've forgotten most of the >> brown: and remembering a stalwart of american political journalism. we look back at the career of the long-time reporter, columnist and t.v. commentator, jack germond. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supported by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. >> brown: the political crisis in egypt reached a new turning point today. security forces made good on a pledge to sweep away sit-ins that sprang up after the military ousted president mohammed morsi in late june. the country's health ministry reported at least 235 civilians and 4
washington post" company agreed monday to sell its flagship newspaper to amazon.com founder and chief executive jeffrey these those. ownership of the paper after four generations. next week at back at former "washington post" owner the late katharine graham discussing her biography, personal history. c-span: author personal history did your children learn anything from this book about you? >> guest: that's a hard question. i'm sure they probably did but i couldn't tell you exact a wife. c-span: all of the stuff in here about your early life and your husband about that, did you talk that out? >> guest: yes, i think they understand that he was ill. the oldest one was 20 and the youngest one was 11 so they had to deal with it then and always. c-span: the question i had after i read the book was why do you want us to know all of this? >> guest: i really don't suppose that i meant to tell everything to everybody but once i sat down to write my story i just tend to be frank and open and i wanted to be very truthful and i wrote it the way i saw it. i told it the best i could. c-span: when di
. >> announcer: from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> straight to the breaking news. a heavy security presence in cairo, egypt, this morning as military rulers are trying to strengthen their control over a country descending into chaos. so, how much worse will it get in egypt? hundreds are dead, nearly 40 christian churches have been torched and looted, and supporters of the ousted president morsi, the muslim brotherhood, are vowing to fight back. we'll have a live report coming up from cairo in just a moment, but back here in washington, the critical question is, are u.s. taxpayers, in effect, footing the bill for the continuing violence? joining me now, two members of the senate armed services committee, democrat jack reed of rhode island and republican kelly ayotte of new hampshire. senators, welcome to you both. senator ayotte, straight to you. several weeks ago, this question came up -- should we keep the u.s. aid flowing to egypt? you said yes then. have you had a change of heart now? >> well, i think, david, in lig
a moment, but back here in washington, the critical question is, are u.s. taxpayers, in effect, footing the bill for the continuing violence? joining me now, two members of the senate armed services committee, democrat jack reed of rhode island and republican kelly ayotte of new hampshire. senators, welcome to you both. senator ayotte, straight to you. several weeks ago, this question came up -- should we keep the u.s. aid flowing to egypt? you said yes then. have you had a change of heart now? >> well, i think, david, in light of recent actions, we tried to give some time to the administration. they obviously tried to get the military government to not crack down in a violent way, to restore democracy, to move to elections, to release political prisoners. they have ignored all of those requests. and now with the recent violent crackdown, i do not see how we can continue aid. i believe it must be suspended because, unfortunately, i think the military's gotten the impression, and particularly with what the president not asking for aid to be suspended when he spoke this week, that whateve
on the washington debate. thank you both very much for your time this morning. >> thank you. >> let me bring in richard engel, our chief foreign correspondent, on the ground in cairo, as well as senior fellow at the woodrow wilson center, robin wright, an expert on the broader middle east for context here. richard, your reporting has been compelling from the chaotic streets of cairo. given your sense of things, where is this headed? >> reporter: well, i think a lot of it depends on what happens in washington. and just to continue on the debate you were just having, people in this country and around the region think it would be an absolutely disastrous idea for the united states to cut off aid, that washington has real interests with the egyptian military, preferential access to the suez canal, military overflights, and not to mention the camp david accords. the camp david accords brokered by the united states, the peace agreement between israel and egypt, says in principle that u.s. aid should be commensurate between israel, from washington to israel and from washington to egypt. and does th
but is it just a ploy to sell books? >>> should marijuana be decriminalized. it is in washington state. >>> and i'm abby huntsman. how do people feel about men and women in power, like their bosses? we'll report how men and women see men and women in power on "the cycle" on august 19th, 2013. ♪ >>> shout out to carol king. we begin with egypt as america focuses on that $1.5 billion in aid we give egypt each year. more than 800 people are confirmed dead since wednesday. that number is expected to go higher. adding the potential for more unrest is this. hosni mubarak might be released while awaiting trial. over the weekend, 25 off-duty egyptian policemen were executed in an ambush. also, 36 prisoners were killed while in custody. there are varying accounts as to what happened there. we're going to take a two-pronged approach. first, the international implications and then the domestic, political side of it here in america. for that we have two people who know. former white house mideast adviser, ambassador mark ginsburg. for the politics of it all, dana millbank. first to you, am
anniversary of a water shed moment in our nation's history, here is a picture now from washington, dc, and you can see oprah is speaking at this very moment and it is raining because you can see the umbrellas. president obama and civil rights activists can demands are gathering at the lincoln memorial mark, the 1963 march on washington led by dr. martin luther king jr. early today, leap rhymes sang "amazing grace." ♪ amazing grace ♪ how sweet the sound jamie foxx and al sharpton also spoke this morning. >> abc7 news is joined by our reporter in washington, dc. >> good morning, that is oprah winfrey talking behind me and it is a tall order to try to speak as she is speaking but right now you can see that the people have all their eyes on oprah. it seems like this maybe was a little bit slow to get going but it is very humid here and this has been a lot of rain and people have to go through security checkpoints in order to come out here but, now, this is a crowd that is excited and eagerly awaiting remarks from president obama. it is impossible to miss the symbolism of the nation's first bla
know, with iraq and the attacks on the terrorist targets. it's the way washington is unfortunately. that those leaks come out. i guess it's part and parcel of the way our open government works and the nature of what happened in d.c. >> thank you, general, for joining us this morning. in our next hour we'll talk about the u.s. options in syria with the chairman of the senate foreign relations committee. senator men nen doesendez will join us. >>> a military jury needed just two hours yesterday to decide on a death sentence for major hasan, the ft. hood gunman. he admitted killing 13 people and did not defend himself at his trial. he said he acted to protect islamic fighters overseas. he will be the first american soldier to be executed in more than 50 years. >>> firefighters in california's syriaear sierra nevada are gaining ground this morning on the rim fire in yosemite national park. video shows just how big this fire is. yesterday, the flames forced park officials to close the main entrance on yosemite's east side. the fire is now 30% contained this morning.
the broadcast the washington post reports the national security agency has broken privacy rules or overstepped its legal authority thousands of times each year since it was given broad new spy powers by congress in 2008. in a separate post story, the leader of the secret court that supposed to oversee the spy program says its ability to do so is limited and that it must trust the government to report when it improperly spies on americans. we will have more on the story with alexander abdo after the headlines. reuters is reporting edward snowden began downloading documents related to widespread u.s. spying while working for dell last april, almost a year earlier than has previously been reported breed prior stories have focused on snow and subsequent three-month stint with contractor booz allen hamilton holding. snowden said that people associate with his father have, in his words, misled journalists into printing false claims about my situation. snowden said neither his father nor his father's lawyer nor his lawyer's wife and spokesperson represent him in any way. in lebanon, a car bomb tore t
perez. o'bryan.teve ♪ tot: good morning, welcome "the washington journal." we are in the waning days of a congressional recess and members of congress are gearing up for this fall's legislative agenda. a question for all of you this morning, what is your message to house and senate lawmakers as they prepare to turn to -- returned to washington next month. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. also send as a tweet, if you go to twitter.com/c-spanwj or post your comments on facebook.com/cspan or e-mail us at journal@c-span.org. a piece this morning from janet hauck, a town hall meetings happening across the country, this is what she reports -- of color that is a bit on what is happening in town hall meetings across the country. here on c-span we have been those town hall meetings and if you are interested in watching them, you can go to c-span.org. before we came up live here we were showing you a recent town hall meeting with congressman justin [indiscernible] a republican who many of you know is against the nsa program. nsa,
comments from the ambassador there. the washington side from you if we stop giving aid to egypt, then, yes, vladimir putin might come in. then we lose a key ally or change a key ally in that important region. so what has washington got to consider here? >> well, the ambassador was talking about how it all is naval gazing. that, of course, is the great national past time here in the capital. i've just left today's white house briefing that was dominated by that very question of what will happen to that aid. as you would expect, they're making no commitment one way or the other. found many ways to deflect that over the hour. the good news, perhaps, is that congress is still out of session for another few weeks, so no decision actually needs to be made. they won't be forcing anybody's hand. they can wait and see how things develop here. there was no appetite for suspending aid before this most recent crackdown, as we saw on the hill before they left town. obviously, this could change. it seems to me that the administration is saying, all right, we've got a little breathing room, not in terms
. let's play "hardball." good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. ask yourself, would abraham lincoln be a republican in 2013? would the man sitting up in that chair yesterday be invited to join the party of the birth errs, nullifiers and talkers of succession? just ask yourself in a lineup of ted cruz, rick perry and michele bachmann, and the great emancipator, who would be the odd man out? the reason the republican party wasn't represented yesterday at the king reunion at the lincoln memorial is that the republican party no more longer represents abraham lincoln. its real leader today would be jefferson davis or george wallace or strom thurmond, or some other character in the long list of null fires and obstructionists and states righters. can you imagine the reaction of tom paul had he been alive at the time of the emancipation proclamation? please don't ask. can you imagine to rick perry's claim that texas has the right to succeed from the unionany time it phil feels like it. the values of abraham lincoln, the belief in a strong federal government, the paramount right of h
than the timeline of the way things are unfolding on the streets of cairo. we come back to washington. >> no, i do not think so, because during the time period we are talking about, a joint diplomatic endeavor with the uae, i believe it was, in cairo, and you had, i think, a kind of very real hope that, as i said earlier, all of this could be put quickly on the rails, and you could avoid this uncomfortable discussion for washington, was it military, was it not, and what you have now is a completely different situation. it is completely radicalized, where you have no apparent room for compromise, and a consistent upping of the rhetoric, i would say -- >> the two u.s. senators, john mccain and lindsey graham, they went to cairo, and they were talking about the military. >> but they are two voices in congress that has taken a quite different view looking at the larger stakes involved. i think for the united states, the larger stakes, what the u.s. government is trying to do, what washington is trying to do is to remind everybody, particularly egypt, that egypt is very delicate, and some
in a few days, if washington goes soon it could find itself acting alone. >> the briefing just broke up. has the white house got the backing he needs here at home, if not abroad? like that is a question that will be answered in the coming hours. what we do know is smooth the evidence they presented, they actually said that bashar al- assad's brother may have been involved in the chemical weapons attack alleged on eastern damascus. they said they have intercepted some sort of calls and such removal in before the attack as well. this has not swayed some members of congress, key members of congress. we had bob corker, he says there should be a vote. the libyan campaign, there was no vote for action. >> nathan king in our washington newsroom, thanks. to the united kingdom. it was supposed to be a chance for members of parliament to vote for a british-backed military intervention in syria within days. instead, mp's voted to reject military action. the boat leaves the u.k.'s foreign policy in syria in question. divisions run deep inside of parliament and among the public. >> syrians outside o
about the nsa. "the washington post" just reporting the nsa has broken privacy rules or overstepped legal authority thousands of times each year since 2008. according to an internal audit, most of the violations are of americans or foreign intelligence officials in the united states. and the "washington post" also reporting that the chief judge of the secret court that's supposed to provide oversight of the government's spying program says the court's ability to do so is limited. john sununu joins us. good evening, sir. >> good evening. >> with the news breaking, certainly an expansion of what we have been hearing about the nsa in terms of swpying. your thoughts? >> two things. a lot of what happens in an agency, even the nsa, is a reflection of the culture they see from the top. you have a. president and administration that levels in going beyond the box f you will, that they are limited to by law. i think that seeped all the way down into the nsa. even though the audit says i think it's in the last year they point out there's nearly 3,000 violati violations, it does say that the b
. presidents present and past, gather at the mall in washington. >> nidal hasan is a coward and unrepentant murderer. >> a convicted felon receives a death sentence. >>> u.n.'s leader asks for more time for inspections and diplomas. diplomacy. the 50s anniversary of the march on washington brought out some of the biggest names in politics and the civil righting movement. tengz of thousands gathered at the lincoln memorial, congressman john lewis, the only living person who spoke 50 years ago was there. keynote speaker president obama. >> march 50 years ago was not merely how many blacks could join the ranks of millionaires, it was whether this country would admit all people who were willing to work hard regardless of race into the ranks of a middle class life. >> mike viquera joins us. there was forrest whittaker, oprah winfrey was there, i'm curious who the crowd responded to most. >> you know tony it was an extraordinary day, it was renewal, celebration and commemoration. a lot of people who were talented public speakers really moved the crowd. and i gt to mention there was music that was
going on in what rand paul just said. he's using this washington speech to describe a conference committee, which is the basic premise of government when two chambers have two competing bills. you come together and pass a compromised piece of legislation. that's not happening in washington these days on anything, let alone a major matter of something where they have fundamental disagreement with senate democrats obviously favoring the president's health care law and house republicans voting against it now 39, 40 times to repeal it. so that's not going to happen. so what happens in the meantime is you bring it up to this sort of again at the brink of a shutdown and the president has been very careful to pick at republicans saying, hey, if that happens, you're the one who is are going to take the blame. he has some numbers to back them up. he's been talking about some of these different numbers and some of the polls and house republicans are taking the majority to blame for dysfunction in washington and we've had these crisis government moments over the last several years where the
electric grid. then a look at a recent survey on american's view on aging. "washington journal" is next. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioned by the national captioning institute -www.ncicap.org--] ♪ host: one of the more news headlines this friday morning said the u.s. is treading lightly as the prices deepens in egypt. this has nearly 600 people have been killed amid what are being described as ferocious clashes between protestors and security forces. and another headline says egyptians are bracing for more bloodshed today. to the question that's out there. should the u.s. cut off foreign aid to egypt. a lot of folks are saying that but so far, it hasn't happened. what do you think? call numbers on your screen. or you can put your voice on the program via twitter, facebook and send us an maul -- -- e-mail theere is the front page of "wall street journal" today. the lead headlines says egyptians are bracing for more bloodshed. there is a photo of egyptian soldiers guarding an area around a
. our special coverage of the anniversary of the march on washington. today, i'll talk to one of martin luther king's top lieutenants in the fate for civil rights. legendary singer, actor, activist, harry belafonte. >> to be in washington was for me today a beginning really, a kind of a climax to generations of hope. >>> good day, i'm in washington where u.s. officials tell nbc news that limited military strikes again syria could begin, could, in a matter of days. rebel leaders have told chief foreign correspondent richard engle that they hope the u.s. acts before assad launches another chemical attack. >> if there is no action, we are afraid that in the coming days, not the coming weeks, bashar will use chemical weapons and chemical materials against very wide areas. i'm afraid to see of -- that a number of the killed will be 20,000 or 30,000. >> richard engle joins us now from turkey near the syria border. well, richard, the concerns that the rebels have, they believe the evidence is solid. we heard from secretary kerry yesterday. he would not have said what he said. still, the intell
at the national press club in washington, d.c. he addressed a voter id laws and the feature of the republican party. this is about one hour. >> our speaker today is benjamin jealous,who at 35 became the youngest president and ceo of the national association for the advancement of colored people. a mixed race kid from california, jealous grew up in a family always challenged by the issue of race. according to an interview in "essence" magazine, his grandparents faced obstacles dating back to slavery. his mother helped desegregate her high school in baltimore, and joined sit-ins at lunch counters in virginia. his father told him what it was like to be the lone white guy at a lunch counter sit-in and getting worked over by the police, who saw him as a race traitor. as a kid, mr. jealous recalls being at a discount store with a black friend, and noticing a white lady peeking at them through the pegboard to make sure they were not stealing anything. he has led advocacy, but he could, at one time, qualify for mentorship at the national press club. reliable reports say he once tried his hand at inve
we don't want to knbout the washington establishment exposing the reality of what you probably think of washington and the author joins me here next with his runaway best seller. lou: the new book "this town" to a party is in a funeral suggest there are nofu longer democrats or th republicans in washington we being only wealthy folks that have the incestuous relationship with one another. lehman joined by "new york times" magazinethe correspondent,b congratulatio ns on the book. >> you are roaring. >> people seem to like it media will get run out of town. >> i recommend you read itc because it's really revealse to folks. >> in the words of tomnd h coburn a very conservative congressman it is a self perpetuating careerrpet politician, a media in the usual spect. lou: those that run the country that are in part of the imrtant process and end henry previously long dash previously features stephen he doesn't like me much. lou: he is sincere. >> but i don't believe him. [laughter] >> he is a great guy a.h lou: i have known to me for almost 30 yrs. she has created herself and a role that y
action. tonight chief washington correspondent james rosen tells us the prospect is not an easy sell overseas either. >> reporter: for british prime minister david cameron sudden and stiff resistance to the uk's participation for its alleged chemical weapons use. >> the question is what if any military action we should take and what criteria should determine that decision. >> it is not because of the weapons but because the american president foolishly drew a red line. and because of his position now he is going to attack or face humiliati humiliation. >> let's not pretend there is one smoking piece of intelligence to solve the problem. >> it is not about invading or regime change. to me the biggest danger escalation is if the world community stands back and does nothing. i think assad will draw very clear conclusions from that. >> reporter: u.s. officials indicated a willingness to move without downing. >> we would not necessarily act on the same basis of the same legal doctrines of our allies. we also said the president will make a decision and act on any response on our own timeli
. go to doug luzader live in washington with the latest. >> good morning. whatever coalition the president was hoping to build here now appears to be in at that timers this morning with a key u.s. ally now saying it will not take part in a military strike on syria. the administration suffered a big set back of particlism refusing to back any attack. >> the british parliament does not want to see british military action. i get that and the government will act accordingliful>> president obama meantime is expected to seek congressional approval for action in syria. it raises serious constitutional questions. select members of congress to make a case of war outlining evidence that the syrian regime avoid chemical weapons. the president did not take part in it. >> they are going to issue a statement and they are in the process of de classifying. when we do that we do understand. it's up to the president of the united states to present this case to sell it to the american public. >> that is going to be the next likely step. they are likely to release a de classified version to the
this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: good morning again. well, the situation in egypt is no better today. since the military crackdown on pro morsi forces began on wednesday, more than 800 have been killed, at least a thousand people are wounded, there is noend in sight. we're going to begin this morning with cbs news correspondent charlie d'agata who is in cairo. charlie, bring us up to date. what's the latest? >> bob, we're expecting more demonstrations today and they're bracing for it here. we're seeing two worlds emerging. it's like two different versions. the story you're seeing there in the outside world and what you're seeing here in egypt and egyptian television. we've just come back from the foreign ministry and we were handed these photos that show muslim brotherhood members and supporters using live ammunition against security forces. and it reads under the banner "egypt fights terrorism." and what they're trying to suggest is that we're getting it wrong, that this is security forces t
, "daily beast" editor and "washington post" columnist and msnbc contributor jonathan capehart, and senior editor for "the atlantic," and former fellow on the press. and diplomatic correspondent for the "washington post," ann guerin. and joining us from cairo, nbc news foreign correspondent amman mojadin. when we look at the rising crescendo of a potential strike as early as thursday, as i mentioned, are we understand to understand that most of the diplomatic solutions are off the table from the u.s. perspective? >> yes. i mean as far as a diplomatic solution that would avert a military one. as a component of any military strike the united states were to initiate, it is trying very hard to get diplomatic backing which is a different thing. so you've seen some of that happening over the last couple of days, and you saw an important element in that recipe coming today with the arab league saying that chemical weapons were used and appearing to back some open international response. stopped short of saying that bombing military sites in syria was acceptable. but it's exactly the kind of regio
into the national mall here in washington, d.c. the day was hot, they marched through the nation's capital. they were standing in the sun mopping sweat from their brows when the moment arrived, when dr. martin luther king jr. shared his dream. >> i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >>> it became clear that day with it wasn't clear already that change was coming. this was the scene at the national mall on that day, august 28th, 1963. and this was the scene at the mall today. on the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. 50 years since dr. king took the podium with a vision of abraham lincoln looking on from the memorial perch. the king family rang a bell at the mall in unison with bells at more than 300 sites across the country from alabama to alaska at the very hour that dr. king implored the nation to led freedom ring. in washington they say it's a great drizly late summer day, but no way it would stop this crowd from coming out.
. the march on washington teaches us that we are not trapped by the mistakes of history. we are masters of our fate. it also teaches us that the promise of this nation will only be kept when we work together. we will have to reignite the embers of empathy and fellow feeling, the coalition of conscience that found expression in this place 50 years ago. i believe that spirit is there. that force inside each of us. i see it when a mother recognizes her own daughter in the face of a poor black child. i see it when the black youth think of his own grandfather in the dignified steps of an elderly white man. it is there when the nativeborn recognizes that striving spirit, when interracial couple connects the pain of a gay couple and experiences it as their own. that is were courage comes from. when we turn not from each other, or on each other, but towards one another and we find that we do not walk alone. that is were courage comes from. -- where courage comes from. [cheers and applause] with that courage, we can stand together for good jobs and just wages. we can stand together for the right to hea
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